Who is the Best Bunny in Children's Literature? May 24 2017

We here at Tales for Tadpoles like to bring you the hard-hitting questions of the day. It’s important to take the time to question your beliefs and make up your mind on where you stand on important issues. So ask yourself this, who really is the best children’s book bunny? We ran a quick poll on Twitter and Instagram earlier this month, but now we want to open this conversation further and delve into what makes each bunny unique. We’ve listed five of the main contenders here, with rabbits from classic literature to more modern picture books. To make it easier we’ve assigned each rabbit a music genre or song, type of cuisine, and mode of transport, so that you can figure out which one you might relate to most. When you’ve decided who you’re backing, make sure to give us your opinion in the comments below!

 

1. Peter Rabbit

                                            Peter Rabbit

 

Possibly the best known rabbit of all the children’s book rabbits. Will score points with the rebellious crowd for his flagrant disregard for the rules in pillaging Mr. McGregor’s produce, just when his good mother told him not to. Perhaps he is also an eco-warrior concerned about food waste in modern farming methods? There’s definitely an undergraduate thesis in there somewhere… 

                                                The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter

Peter is a beloved nostalgic figure for many generations, and has been part of peoples’ childhoods for over a hundred years.  In terms of design, Peter is an anatomically correct rabbit, but he wears a tiny jacket and pair of loafers. What a combination! Beatrix Potter’s fine balance between realism and whimsy is what makes her still so popular today.

Soundtrack: Peter is definitely a little punk

Food: Radishes

Mode of transport: Wanders about going “lippity- lippity-, not very fast”

Tiny jacket rating: 10/10

                                               Peter Rabbit and Family Cup and Saucer

 

2. Miffy

                                      Miffy Print

Miffy is everyone’s favourite minimalist, everyone’s favourite bicyclist and everyone’s favourite artist. How she fits all these activities into the day is frankly remarkable, and all without opposable thumbs!

                                              Miffy cycling in rain print

She is an action bunny and has starred in such stories as Miffy the Artist, Miffy’s Bicycle, Miffy is Crying and Miffy at the Playground. Miffy will win points with some for being slightly alternative. She is originally from the Netherlands, where she is known as Njintje, and like all cool, alternative things, she is very popular in Japan. In terms of illustration, Miffy is very different to Peter Rabbit, being created out of minimal strong black lines, block colours and defined shapes.

                                           Miffy by Dick Bruna

Dick Bruna created his own colour palette to work with on the Miffy books so that they would be recognisable instantly. Miffy has been on the scene since the mid 1950s, but Bruna's style of drawing still looks modern today. 

Soundtrack: Minimalist electronica

Food: Sushi

Mode of transport: Bicycle 

Tiny jacket rating: Miffy has many tiny, well put together outfits. Dick Bruna made her a girl bunny because he found dresses more interesting to draw than trousers. Miffy also gains sartorial points for the snow-hat she can sometimes be seen in, which is shaped to cover her entire ears.

                                               

 

Miffy

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Rabbit from Winnie the Pooh

                                    Rabbit from Winnie the Pooh

Unlike most of the other animals of the Hundred Acre Wood, who are based on Christopher Robin's soft toys, Rabbit is a real rabbit. This gives him a sense of self-importance that he usually fails to live up to. Like Peter Rabbit he is drawn realistically and often shown standing on two feet and gesturing at things. Rabbits can stand on two feet in real life, but whether they gesture at things is a matter of debate. Rabbit is introduced to the Winnie the Pooh stories when he invites Pooh into his burrow for a visit. Pooh, being Pooh, eats too much and gets stuck in the hole on the way out, and for this scene alone Rabbit deserves a place on this list.

                                 Winnie the Pooh print

He loses points for not having a tiny jacket, though at one point he says he would need seventeen pockets to carry all of his friends and relations around with him, so perhaps he has an overcoat in his burrow that we don’t know about. Rabbit is looked up to by the other characters; he is often called upon to settle things, and to take charge of group events. However he usually gets rather flustered and messes them up.

Soundtrack: ‘For Emma’ by Bon Iver: “for all your lies, you’re still very lovable”.

Food: Vegan fine dining

Mode of transport: Public transport, because he is community minded.

Tiny jacket rating: Rabbit is a naturist and wears no clothes.

 

 

4. The White Rabbit from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

                                  Arthur Rackham Alice in Wonderland Print                       

Without the White Rabbit there would be no Alice in Wonderland! There would merely be Alice Sitting on the Bank of a River While Her Sister Reads A Book, which would not have made a very good story at all. The White Rabbit is the first hint that things are about to get weird in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.  When he takes a watch out of his waistcoat pocket, Alice realises that not only do rabbits not generally have watches, they don’t generally have waistcoat pockets either. The White Rabbit leads Alice down the rabbit hole and so begins the great adventure we all love! It’s possible that the White Rabbit is the rabbit of most literary significance on this list, with Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland having never been out of print since its publication over 150 years ago. Another point to consider is that there is no end to representations of the White Rabbit, so he has something to suit any taste in illustration style.

                                  White Rabbit illustration by Helen Oxenbury    The White Rabbit illustration by Robert Ingpen

The White Rabbit consulting his pocket watch (Helen Oxenbury) and breaking into a run (Robert Ingpen)       The White Rabbit by Sir John Tenniel         

                                                         Sir John Tenniel's original White Rabbit

Soundtrack: Psychedelic rock

Food: Afternoon tea

Method of transport: Running late!

Tiny jacket rating: Most certainly has a waistcoat, and a watch in his pocket.

 

 5. The rabbit in I Want My Hat Back

                        I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen

The most recent rabbit on this list, this rabbit is a key character in I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen. He is the one seen wearing the hat that looks suspiciously like the hat the bear is looking for in the title.

                        I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen

Soon after the bear realises this, the rabbit mysteriously disappears and is never seen again. Like Peter Rabbit, this rabbit is undeniably a petty thief, but unlike Peter, who sheds a tear or two, he expresses no remorse. He is rendered in Klassen’s recognisable clean style, using watercolour and ink, with very expressive (shifty) eyes. Klassen's subsersive sense of humour means the fluffy bunny rabbit is the dishonest villain in this book, so he may deserve your vote for subverting bunny norms.

Soundtrack: 'Smooth Criminal' by Michael Jackson.

Food: Whatever is on someone else's plate.

Mode of transport: Getaway car.

Tiny jacket rating: All this rabbit is wearing is the hat that will lead to his demise.

Please cast your vote and settle this once and for all! And if you have another suggestion for the best rabbits in children’s literature, please let us know - we may even let you include hares